Data center construction a bright spot during COVID-19

Morris MacMatzen / Stringer via Getty Images

Note from the editor

As the world grows smaller with the addition of more increasingly connected devices, the need for infrastructure supporting those devices' data has grown. 

Medical and financial records, social media services, entertainment and industries from shipping to manufacturing to retail all rely on information that moves through a data center.

As the need for businesses and consumers to stay connected continues to rise, so does the need for new data centers that can handle the volume of information. Customers like Facebook, Google and Apple, according to research company Arizton, will make data center construction an $11 billion industry by 2024.

Read on for more about this bright spot in the construction sector, which has continued to grow even during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Data center construction market continues to boom

Amazon, Google and Facebook are pouring billions into construction of data centers around the U.S.

• Published Nov. 2, 2020

HITT, Fluor, Turner rise to the challenges of data center construction

• Published Jan. 22, 2020

$430B Apple plan part of surge in data center construction

• Published Jan. 3, 2019

Google commits $7B to offices, data centers in 2021

• Published March 23, 2021

Facebook building $800M Chicago-area data center

• Published July 6, 2020

Inside the boom in data center construction

As the world grows smaller with the addition of more increasingly connected devices, the need for physical infrastructure supporting those devices' data has grown. By 2024, data center construction is projected to be $11 billion industry.

included in this trendline
  • $430B Apple plan part of surge in data center construction
  • Google commits $7B to offices, data centers in 2021
  • Facebook building $800M Chicago-area data center
Our Trendlines go deep on the biggest trends. These special reports, produced by our team of award-winning journalists, help business leaders understand how their industries are changing.
Davide Savenije Editor-in-Chief at Industry Dive.